Endless Loop FF string

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htoler
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Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2006 6:45 pm

Endless Loop FF string

Post by htoler » Mon Jan 08, 2007 1:48 pm

does anyone still have one of these strings and if you do is their a chance you could post a pic of it? have some guys on another forum that would like to see what this string looks like..

Thanks
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Jim C
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Post by Jim C » Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:22 pm

an endless loop string is what 95% of the strings on the market look like for recurves and compounds. a flemish twist is easily identifiable by two distinct bundles of threads twisted together. You generally cannot tell from a picture the difference between a fast flite ELS and a dacron ELS
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htoler
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Post by htoler » Mon Jan 08, 2007 4:01 pm

thanks for the info Jim,, I was told on another forum there was no such thing as an endless loop FF string..
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wabi
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Post by wabi » Mon Jan 08, 2007 5:45 pm

String basics.
There are 2 commonly used styles of bowstring today. Endless loop and flemish twist. Endless loop strings are easily recognized by the loops that are served (wrapped) with a separate thread over the fibers that make the string (the loop looks similar to the center serving where the arrow goes). Flemish twist strings have loops made of the same fibers as the string and are twisted back into the string into a splice to form the loops (the loop looks just like the rest of the string).
The commonly used fibers that make up the bowstring are dacron or fastflight. Fastflight is a brand name, but also a generic term applied to many brands and types of fibers having similar properties. There are several brands/types fibers that fall into this category, each offering slightly different properties, but for the sake of keeping the discussion simple I'll lump them all into one general category - fastflight. Dacron (polyester) is a very strong fiber in relation to diameter and for years was the most commonly used fiber for stringmaking. It gives good strength for it's diameter, but is does tend to stretch or have some elasticity. Fastflight fibers also have very high strength in relation to diameter, but they are much less elastic. They make use of much of the energy that is wasted by stretching offering more arrow speed plus a slightly smaller diameter and less weight. The disadvantages are that due to the strength and lack of stretch they bring the bow limbs to a very abrupt halt at the end of the power stroke and stress the limbs much more than with dacron. Limbs with the old style of string groove simply carved into the limbs can be severely damaged by a fastflight string which can cut into the limb and cause it to split. Fastflight requires the use of a reinforced string groove to protect against damage.
Either style of string can easily be made of either type material. You can have endless loop dacron and you can have endless loop fast flight. The same is true of flemish twist style strings, dacron or fastflight can be made. Both fastflight type fibers and dacron fibers are available in a wide variety of colors to the stringmaker, so color is no indication of the fiber's properties.
Summary:
Fastflight strings offer increased arrow speeds, but they also stress limbs more and can only be used on bows that are designed by the manufacturer to withstand this stress.
Dacron can be used on about any modern bow, but gives slightly less speed, stresses limbs less, and generally causes less felt vibration and is a little quieter to shoot.
My personal opinion:
I have used all of them - fastflight endless loop, dacron endless loop, fastflight flemish twist, and dacron flemish twist on my Excalibur(s). My preference is flemish twist dacron for a noticeable reduction in noise and vibration, but I mostly use endless loop dacron simply because they are easy to make and I make my own. :lol: Nothing against fastflight and/or those who want to tweak top velocity out of their crossbow, but I can't tell the difference between an arrow going 295fps or one doing 305fps with my naked eye, and neither can the deer I've shot. The bow is quieter and there is less vibration with dacron, plus the limbs just might last a little longer. Same goes for my longbows & recurves, but the speeds are a lot less. :wink:
wabi

Jim C
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Post by Jim C » Mon Jan 08, 2007 10:19 pm

Just to add a bit to the excellent post above

Fastflite is made of SPECTRA (HMPE) which I believe now is owned by the Honeywell Company-at one time Allied Signal owned it. Spectra is hard to get because almost all american production has been requisitioned for military (body armor) use and the rest goes to commercial maritime and fishing industries. That is why Brownell's FF and TS-1 is no longer available readily while TS-1 Plus which is another type of HMPE called dyneema has replaced it as their main bowstring material

Dyneema is made by DSM in Europe. The current euro stuff is a heavier thickness (denier) than the original dyneema marketed for bowstrings (its original use was as maritime ropes) Dyneema is marketed by Brownell as D-75 and D-75 thin and by BCY as 8125, Dynaflite 97 and 02. (size of strands and waxing is different) DSM licensed the original dyneema to Angel in Japan which is popular with olympic recurve because it has no wax and is very fast but a pain to work with since it snags easily

BOth major companies add stuff called vectran to fastflite or Dyneema to get the "Non stretch" string material such as S4 (vectran and Spectra) and Dyneema/vectran blends like 450 452, and Ultracam. This stuff is mainly used by compound archers who worry about their cables creeping or the peep spinning around if the strings stretch. the pure dyneema strings tend to last slightly longer and are slightly faster than the slightly more stable vectran blends.
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